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AT&T Copyright Alert Program FAQs

Q.

How does AT&T's Copyright Alert Program work?

A.

AT&T provides a mechanism for owners of copyrighted content (e.g. music, movies, videos, books, artwork, and images) to notify AT&T if they believe that a customer is using AT&T's transitory digital network communications service (i.e. Internet Service) to share copyrighted content without their permission. Under this program, copyright owners may send AT&T a notice of alleged copyright infringement identifying the IP Address of the user that allegedly engaged in copyright infringement, the title of the copyrighted work at issue, and the date and time of the alleged infringement. AT&T then passes along the notice at the request of the copyright owner to the appropriate Internet Service account holder to alert them about the potentially infringing activity so that they may take steps to prevent copyright infringement on their account.


If AT&T receives additional notices for a particular subscriber account, the Copyright Alerts will escalate, and we may temporarily redirect your Internet access to a webpage where the accountholder must view an educational tutorial on the importance of copyright and the lawful use of content available over the Internet. Upon completion of this educational tutorial, your Internet service will be restored to normal. If we continue to receive additional copyright infringement notices after this step, your AT&T Internet service may be terminated pursuant with AT&T's Repeat Infringer Policy. A subscriber's receipt of multiple Copyright Alerts will be a factor used by AT&T in determining whether to terminate their service under the AT&T's Repeat Infringer Policy.


Copyright infringement is illegal and violates the AT&T Internet Terms of Service and Acceptable Use Policy. Subscribers should not engage in copyright infringement and should ensure that others using their Internet account do the same. Importantly, if the subscriber's home network is not protected or secured by a password or firewall, and unauthorized users are accessing the subscriber's network, they may be the source of the problem.

Q.

Does AT&T provide my personal information to the copyright owner?

A.

AT&T does not monitor what our customers are downloading, and we will not provide identifying information about a subscriber to copyright owners unless required to do so by lawful request.

Q.

What is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)?

A.

The DMCA was passed in 1998 by the U.S. Congress to protect copyrighted works in the digital age while providing important protections for online service providers to ensure the free flow of information. Additional information about the DMCA is available at the U. S. Copyright Office's website at http://www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf.

Q.

Is it illegal to share copyrighted material?

A.

Sharing copyrighted material using peer-to-peer technologies without the permission of the copyright owner or its authorized representative is unlawful in most cases. This is called "copyright infringement," and it violates not only U.S. copyright law, but also AT&T's Acceptable Use Policy and Internet Terms of Service. AT&T's Acceptable Use Policy specifically prohibits customers from violating AT&T's or any third party's copyrighted works, trademarks, or other proprietary or intellectual property rights. For more information about copyrights and content piracy generally, please visit the U.S. Copyright Office's website at www.copyright.gov.

Q.

What are the legal penalties for violating the copyright laws?

A.

Copyright infringement can subject infringers to potential civil and criminal liability. Additional information about copyright infringement is available at the U. S. Copyright Office's website at http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap5.html.

Q.

How do ISPs and content companies know who downloaded a pirated movie or song?

A.

When files are distributed on the Internet over peer-to-peer networks, the IP address associated with a subscriber's account is visible by design to other users on the network. Content owners and their agents have developed state-of-the-art software that participates in these peer-to-peer networks to identify pirated film, TV and music content that they own and the IP addresses associated with the distribution of that content. Content owners provide these IP addresses to AT&T along with additional information about the content that was allegedly shared by that IP address. AT&T matches the IP address sent by the content owner to the specific customer to whom that IP address was assigned at that time, and then forwards the information provided by the content owner to that user. As noted above, AT&T does not provide identifying information about the user to the content owner(s) unless ordered to do so by a Court.

Q.

Can consumers get movies and music online legally?

A.

Virtually all music, movies, television shows, and software are widely available online from legitimate sources more than ever before. Apple Music, iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music and Sound Cloud are just a few examples of growing businesses delivering music to consumers digitally without breaking the law. Web-based services from Netflix, Amazon and Apple TV are booming. AT&T customers have a wide variety of ways to enjoy content without the need to utilize illegal file-sharing services.

Q.

What tips do you have to avoid further notices?

A.

If you receive a copyright alert, we recommend that you determine whether the content referred to in the alert is on any computer or other device with access to your Internet service and check to see if your computer or other device has any peer-to-peer or file-sharing software on it.

You should also contact any other individuals who have access to your Internet service and discuss the alert with them. Be sure to educate those that use your Internet service regarding copyright infringement. Explain that downloading copyrighted material without permission from the copyright holder is against the law.

If you have a wireless router, please refer to the "If I am using a wireless router/modem, how do I protect my home network?" question and answer below for more information on ways to secure your home network.

Q.

What is "fair use"?

A.

Fair use is a legal doctrine that permits, in certain limited circumstances, the use of portions of copyrighted material without acquiring permission from the rights holder. For more information about fair use, please visit the U.S. Copyright Office's website at http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html.

Q.

I've lost the alert(s) you sent me -- can I view them anywhere else online?

A.

You may view your copyright alerts online by clicking 'View Alerts' in the Acknowledge Alerts section of this website and logging in with your AT&T User ID and password.

Q.

Is Peer-to-Peer file sharing risky?

A.

Yes. Aside from the potential legal liability for copyright infringement described above, the use of peer-to-peer software can expose your computer and other devices to harmful viruses, spyware and other malware that can compromise your privacy. For example, you may download files you think are music or video files using peer-to-peer and file-sharing software that are actually dangerous malware that can secretly steal your passwords, personal information or bank account or credit card numbers.

Q.

If I am using a wireless router or modem, how do I protect my home network?

A.

If you use a wireless router, make sure that it's encrypted. If someone accesses For tips on how to help keep your home network free of unwanted users visit att.com/wifisecurity. In addition AT&T Internet Security Suite powered by McAfee help keep your computer safe and running smooth. Learn about all the great features of AT&T Internet Security Suite powered by McAfee by visiting att.com/securitysuite.

Q.

How do I uninstall Peer-to-Peer software from my computer?

A.

You can remove peer-to-peer software from your computer by following these instructions. You will need the name of the peer-to-peer software so you can locate and remove it.

Windows 8 Users


In the Programs window in the Control Panel, use the Uninstall a Program function to remove (uninstall) these programs - just as you would remove any program from your Windows system.
1. Turn off all file-sharing programs.
2. Go to your computer's Control Panel by pressing the Windows Key + X key to open a task list.
3. Select Control Panel
4. Select Uninstall a Program under Programs
5. Look for peer-to-peer software on the list of installed programs. Click once to highlight the software. At the top of the list of programs, select Uninstall. Follow the prompts on the screen to completely remove the software and its components.

Some peer-to-peer file-sharing programs have companion programs that are not automatically removed. If you have more than one program to remove, click No if prompted to reboot your computer. Then repeat these steps until you have removed all file sharing programs.

6. Make sure you reboot the system when you are finished.

Windows 7 Users


Use the Programs window in the Control Panel to remove (uninstall) these programs - just as you would remove any program from your Windows system.
1. Turn off all file-sharing programs.
2. Go to your computer's Control Panel. You can access Control Panel from your computer's Start logo.
3. Double click on the Programs icon.
4. Look for peer-to-peer software on the list of installed programs. Click once to highlight the software. At the top of the list of programs, select Uninstall.

Follow the prompts on the screen to completely remove the software and its components.

Some peer-to-peer file-sharing programs have companion programs that are not automatically removed. If you have more than one program to remove, click No if prompted to reboot your computer. Then repeat these steps until you have removed all file sharing programs.

5. Make sure you reboot the system when you are finished.

Windows Vista Users


Use the Programs and Features window in the Control Panel to remove (uninstall) these programs - just as you would remove any program from your Windows system.
1. Turn off all file--sharing programs.
2. Go to your computer's Control Panel. You can access Control Panel from your computer's Start logo.
3. Double click on the Programs and Features icon.
4. Look for peer-to-peer software on the list of installed programs. Click once to highlight the software. At the top of the list of programs, select Uninstall.

Follow the prompts on the screen to completely remove the software and its components.

Some peer-to-peer file-sharing programs have companion programs that are not automatically removed. If you have more than one program to remove, click No if prompted to reboot your computer. Then repeat these steps until you have removed all file sharing programs.

5. Make sure you reboot the system when you are finished.

Windows XP Users


Use the Add/Remove Programs window in the Control Panel to remove (uninstall) these programs - just as you would remove any program from your Windows system.
1. Turn off all file-sharing programs.
2. Go to your computer's Control Panel. You can access Control Panel from your computer's Start logo.
3. Double click on the Add/Remove Programs or Add or Remove Programs icon.
4. Select Change or Remove Programs.

Click once to highlight the software you would like to remove, then click on the Remove or Change/Remove button.

Follow the prompts on the screen to completely remove the software and its components.

Some peer-to-peer file-sharing programs have companion programs that are not automatically removed. If you have more than one program to remove, when prompted to reboot the computer, click No. Then repeat these steps until you have removed all file sharing programs.

5. Make sure you reboot the system when you are finished.

Mac Users


1. Quit all file-sharing programs.
2. Locate the folder containing the peer-to-peer software that you want to remove. It is usually in the Applications folder.
3. Double-click the peer-to-peer program's folder to examine its contents.
4. Some Macintosh-compatible peer-to-peer programs come with an "uninstall" program. If you see an "Uninstall" or "Uninstaller" program, run it to remove the peer-to-peer software.

If you do not see such a program, go back to the Applications folder, and move the peer-to-peer program's folder into the trash.

5. Empty your computer’s trash folder.
6. Go to the Apple menu and select Restart to reboot your computer.

Q.

How do I remove copyrighted material from my computer?

A.

You can remove copyrighted material from your computer by following these instructions.

Windows Users


1. Review the copyright alert(s) sent to you by AT&T. The alert(s) will contain the name of the file(s) that is alleged to be infringing material.
2. Enter this file name into your Search window to locate it on your PC. Then delete the file from your PC.
3. Repeat this process for each copyrighted work listed on each alert we sent you.

Mac Users


1. Go to Find.
2. Review the copyright alert(s) sent to you by AT&T. It will contain the name of the file(s) that is alleged to be infringing material. Enter this file name into your Search window to locate it on your Mac and press Delete to remove this file(s) from your Mac.
3. Repeat this process for each copyrighted work listed on each alert we sent you.

Q.

Can AT&T help me remove Peer-to-Peer Software from my computer(s)?

A.

Yes, for technical assistance with removing peer-to-peer software from your computer, please call 844-217-1458.

Q.

How can I dispute a copyright violation on my account?

A.

AT&T is not in a position to investigate these allegations. We are simply passing along a copyright owner's allegation that your Internet account was used for copyright infringement. It's possible the copyright holder could take legal action against you. You may want to consider consulting your own attorney for legal advice.

Q.

What else does AT&T do with the copyright infringement notices it receives?

A.

AT&T does take these notices into account when making a decision of whether to terminate a customer's Internet Service for repeat copyright infringement under its Repeat Infringer Policy, which is referenced in AT&T's Acceptable Use Policy and Internet Terms of Service. We will give you written notice if your account is being considered for termination. If you believe the notification is in error or would like to give us more information, you can send us a written explanation at and we will take your explanation into consideration if your account reaches the stage where we are reviewing it for possible termination. Be sure to include your name, account number, notice ID number, and any records or information that could be used to show that the activity was non-infringing or provide us an explanation.

Q.

As a copyright owner or authorized agent of a content owner, how do I submit a copyright infringement notifications related to alleged infringement activity that has occurred over peer-to-peer networks using AT&T's residential broadband network to AT&T?

A.

Copyright owners or their authorized representatives can submit their allegations of peer-to-peer copyright infringement by submitting notifications intended for AT&T wireline broadband customers using the web form available at att.com/p2pnotices.

Resources

The resources below will provide you with more information on copyright infringement:
1. Summary of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA)
2. For technical assistance with locating and removing peer-to-peer software from your computer, please call 844-217-1458.
3. Questions? Go to att.com/copyright-infringement
For further assistance, contact AT&T by email at AT&T Copyright Alert Program.

Disclaimer

The information on this page is provided to you for informational purpose only, and is not intended as legal advice. If you believe you rights under United States copyright law have been infringed, you should consult with your attorney.

Securing your wireless gateway/router

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One of the most important things you can do to manage your usage is to secure your wireless gateway or router. If you use Wi-Fi at home and you have not secured it with a password, someone with a computer or Wi-Fi-enabled device nearby could access your home network, and their use of your High Speed Internet Service would count towards your data plan.

If you connect to the internet with AT&T-provided Wi-Fi equipment, your connection is likely already secured with your 10-digit Wi-Fi Network Password(WPA - Wi-Fi Protected Access). For AT&T provided equipment, look on the back of your gateway for the 10-digit password.

If you are unable to wirelessly connect to the Internet, here are the steps to get connected and to start surfing with Wi-Fi:


You should now be safely connected to wireless Internet. More detailed instructions can be found in our online self-help. If you use a third party Wi-Fi router with an AT&T modem, please refer to their technical materials on how to secure Wi-Fi with a password. These materials are typically online and available at your manufacturer's support website.

AT&T Parental Controls

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If you have family members, children or friends who share your Internet connection, remember that their online activity will count toward your data plan. AT&T Parental Controls is a free tool included with your service that enables you to customize access to websites, email, instant messaging, chat, message boards, and more for each family member. You can even set time limits for access to the Internet.

Go to http://att.net/parentalcontrols and click on the download button to get AT&T Parental Controls.

You are now leaving the AT&T Copyright Alert Program Web site. The content of the Web site you are visiting is not controlled by AT&T. This link is being offered for your convenience and should not be viewed as an endorsement by AT&T of the content there.

Do you want to proceed?

ATT Logo

Mitigation Landing Page

Why are you seeing this page?

You have been directed to this page as a result of multiple copyright infringement notices AT&T has received from Copyright Holders. AT&T has sent multiple email alerts from the AT&T High Speed Internet Service Center to alert you that copyright infringement notices have been received from Copyright Holders.

Immediate Action Is Required

You must complete the Educational Tutorial.




Troubleshooting Tips:

Question

I usually go to Google and then click in Gmail to get my email. But when I try to access Google, I get sent to the education site. How do I access Gmail?

Answer

Gmail can be accessed by entering gmail.google.com in your internet browser.

Question

I took the tutorial, but still not able to have full Internet access.

Answer

Once tutorial is complete it could take up to four hours to restore your access.

Question

I took the tutorial and waited four hours but I am still directed to the Mitigation Landing Page.

Answer

Please ensure the following steps are taken to restore your full access.

  1. Check "View Alerts" to ensure your Tutorial has been recorded.
  2. Restart the Residential Gateway
  3. Restart any additional Local Area Network Devices such as Wireless Routers attached to your network (if applicable - most Residential Gateways have this built in)
  4. Restart the Computer or Device that is still getting the Mitigation Landing Page.